In order to combat my PTSD, depression, and anxiety, I create. I have done this for many years. Some days I cook, draw, or paint pour. On other days, it is DIY projects, writing, or stencil art. Then, there are days when none of that helps.

New creative ideas and techniques are always fun to try. So, if you have any paint pour techniques, how-to pointers on poetry, advice on self-publishing, etc., please share!!!

(A professional should always be consulted. I am referring to self-care. Whether it is in addition to, or in place of, professional help is your personal business. However, I encourage anyone in need to reach out to a professional, family member, or friend.)

#1

The 5,4,3,2,1 technique. It’s easy to remember and use when a panic attack comes. Name:
5 things you can see,
4 things you can touch and feel,
3 things you can hear,
2 things you can smell,
1 thing you can taste.

Describe each to yourself as you’re naming it. For example, “I can feel the rough and scratchy carpet beneath my feet”.

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Vanessa Emerson
Community Member
5 days ago

My anxiety attacks are physically debilitating. I have the ones where your heart races, the ones where you're nauseous, the "What if..." breakdowns, and then there's the "kick your a**" attacks that charlie-horse my whole body. I am willing to try anything that may help! So, thank you for this.

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#2

I give them names.

The depression is Fido. That’s because Churchill used to call his depression "the black dog", so I call mine Fido. When Fido attacks from hind and bites me in the bum, I say something like "f*** off you flea-ridden piece of s**t."

The anxiety is called Angustias, which is a very old fashioned, Spanish name meaning just that, anxieties. If there’s no-one around I flip the birdie at Angustias.

It helps.

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Vanessa Emerson
Community Member
5 days ago

That's an awesome idea... I give everything else names. So, this would make sense lol. Thank you!

#3

I doodle. It doesn't have to be anything good or grand. Just doodle and listen to music.

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Vanessa Emerson
Community Member
5 days ago

I doodle and cut stencils by hand. Music is a must; I don't know what I'd without it.

#4

I find that blowing bubbles helps with my anxiety, because it helps me focus on breathing (taking deep breaths and letting them out slowly) and I also find it relaxing to just watch the bubbles float around :)

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Vanessa Emerson
Community Member
5 days ago

I will definitely try this. I attempt focusing by doing art or writing. However, this is such a great idea! More calming and less tedious. Thank you!

#5

I safeguard my alone time which is much needed to recharge. I’ve learned that “doing nothing” is a legitimate plan and I have no obligation to be social to appease someone else. Knock on my door unexpectedly? No, I’m sorry you can’t come in. I’ll call or text you when I’m ready for company. Text me randomly and want me to go out right now? Sorry, I have plans to sit on my couch with my dogs, we’ll make future plans another time. I have learned I must be unapologetic about doing what I need to protect my mental health.

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Loolie
Community Member
1 day ago

This is exactly how I am. Everyone who knows me understands which helps a lot.

#6

say something you know is true and then something you want to believe is true
Ex:
"my phone case is pink, I can get through this"
"my shirt has a skull on it, I don't have to be perfect to be good enough"
"It is 12.00, I am safe"

I usually use colors of things but you can de anything true

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bella just chill
Community Member
7 hours ago

I’ve done that too. With OCD, my brain constantly tells me lies so much I think they’re reality, so bringing myself back down to earth like this helps. :)

#7

Listen to music, sing and go for a walk, read Archie Comics, watch stand up comedy or anything wholesome.

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bella just chill
Community Member
7 hours ago

LIT ME-

#8

Diagnosis: Learned behavior OCD with severe Stuck Song Syndrome. General anxiety and mild panic disorder.

- I am med compliant, I see my regular doc every few months to make sure my meds are working.

- I do about 30 mins of yoga a day, I'm really bad at it and hate it but I know it's helping.

- I find ways to reduce my triggers: purchased a countertop dishwasher so I wouldn't obsess over the process of handwashing dishes. I purchased a toll tag so I wouldn't have a panic attack in traffic.

- I talk openly about my mental health with friends and family to reduce social stigma.

- I cross stitch at night to avoid staring at my phone, doom scrolling and pulling out my eyebrows.

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#9

Doodle, listen to music, fidget, look at the stars if possible

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#10

Practice complete silence and walk the trails

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#11

When my anxiety medications and my medical marijuana are not strong enough to help if I can I try to lay down and concentrate on taking deep breaths. I tell myself over and over you're okay, you've been through worse and you can do this. Sometimes this works and sometimes I need a good distraction something funny that's going to make me laugh and forget about how anxious I'm feeling. Some anxiety is just tenacious and stays with you no matter what but experiment and find what works best for you.

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#12

When I get anxiety or depressed I go and find my cat. She has helped me a lot in the past 2 years. She came in as a foster kitten and I adopted her because I wanted a cat from my first fosterlitter. Every night she laid by my side and when I got an anxiety attack she came and laid on top of me. Purring and asking for cuddles. Now I have a lot less anxiety attacks. I'm in trauma therapy but I really think she helped me to reduce them. There was even a period where I couldn't sleep without her by my side. I like to think that it's her way of saying thank you for adopting me.

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#13

I color fuzzy posters and I make posters using stickers. I also watch YouTube videos and watch horror movies.

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#14

Okay so I try to think happy thoughts I try to use my mind to chase away the bad ones. Sometimes it don't work. If it don't I go outside, especially outside by the woods or somewhere where you can be alone an no one will stair at you. Take a deep breath. Look up at the sky. Think how beautiful the sky is.
I watch movie or show that makes me happy or do something that makes me feel good.
I sometimes sleep I know this may not be a good one but it dose help regenerate things in my head and body.
Think about times that made me laugh.

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#15

I actually found a compassionate, empathetic therapist with whom I can share my issues. If I can't get an appointment, I just walk Brutus Augustus around the block and practice my breathing. If that doesn't work, I just scream at the top of my lungs.

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#16

Pace. For some reason when I’m anxious sitting makes it way worse. I also find myself to be pretty relaxed once I come home from cheer. I haven’t really had a panic attack since I started doing cheer daily. Exercise, people! It really helps!

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#17

I'm drawing my fears, my feelings, and my depression ( how it appears in my imagination). I write every words hurting me. And then, rip it appart. I'm listening some music, and try to comfort myself. " Breath in, breath out girl. You can do it. You're enough. And you have the right to cry if you need it".
At night, looking at the moon and stars help me a lot.

Fighting!

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#18

lol,I'm 12 and I have panic attacks VERY often,I have a 17 year old friend who I text if I need

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#19

It’s a form of meditate. It starts with an ‘m’ and has the last three letters ‘ate’ 😁 Every morning and every night. It’s a good way to practice self care, obviously self love, and has great health benefits! Even if I’m too tired I still try because focusing on something other than my anxiety or crushing depression helps my mind to be free for a little while.

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#20

Might not be the best coping method, but I shut myself in my room, pull on headphones and listen to my playlist or true crime. Sometimes FaceTimeing a friend helps. Also, stocking up on stress tools is definitely a plus.

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